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Long-Term Conditions

The power of a cup of tea: psychosocial interventions in dementia

In her book, Mitchell (2022) talks about her relationship with, and the importance of, a cup of tea while living with dementia:.

Dementia and communication

Dementia, what ever the subtype, is caused by underlying disease processes and damage to the nerve cells in the brain. This damage impairs our executive function - the processes in our brains which...

Caring for a person living with dementia: identifying and assessing a carer's needs

Lewis and colleagues (2014) estimated that there are in excess of 700 000 unpaid carers supporting people living with dementia. They went on to suggest that if the ratio of unpaid carers to people...

Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for dementia: what primary care nurses need to know

While there is yet to be a cure for dementia, we know more about its causes and some of the life course factors that may increase a person's risk of developing the condition later in life. The risks...

A Survey of Community Nurses' Knowledge and Strategies Used to Relieve Breathlessness in People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

A total of 59 community registered nurses completed the survey (response rate: 42%; n=59/140 community nurses). There were no missing items. The administration time was approximately 20 minutes. Most...

Dementia: recognition and cognitive testing in community and primary care settings

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE, 2018) guideline, amongst many other things, recommends people thought to have dementia receive timely access to an assessment with the...

Early experiences of telehealth monitoring for patients with COPD and implementation of person-centred care plans

‘A common, preventable, and treatable disease, characterised by persistent respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation,…Due to airway and/or alveolar abnormalities caused by significant exposure to...

What are the benefits of using self-management plans for COPD patients in the community: a critical review of the literature

Three qualitative studies were critiqued. Only one, Laue et al (2017), used a phenomenological design to address the views of patients. A second qualitative study by Williams et al (2014) explored...

Moving with technological advancements: blood glucose monitoring from a district nurse's perspective

The testing of glucose levels is an important intervention. The test results help to determine the best type and dose to be titrated (Gordon, 2019), giving the best results for glycaemic control and...

How can a person-centred approach to occupational therapy practice in the community enhance independence for people living with complex neurological presentations?

Neurological long-term conditions refer to a group of neurological disorders with varying life expectancies, which show gradual deterioration, ultimately leading to death (NHS England, 2019)....

Nurses' role in diabetes management and prevention in community care

The crucial role of the diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs) in the provision of good patient care and promoting self-care management cannot be underestimated. They are often the first point of contact...

Sublingual apomorphine therapy as an alternative to complex continuous infusion pumps in advanced Parkinson's disease treatment: a district nurse-led intervention

The usual route for apomorphine delivery has been subcutaneous, and it is licensed for treatment via administration of injection or infusion in the UK (Table 2). The indication for subcutaneous...

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