This website is intended for healthcare professionals

Aysha Mendes

Freelance journalist specialising in healthcare, psychology and nursing

Email Aysha

Aysha Mendes provides a synopsis and brief review of a selection of recently published research articles that are of interest to community nurses, highlighting key points to keep you up to date; a full reference is provided for those who wish to read the research in more detail

Pressure ulcers are a leading cause of patient harm and are usually avoidable. In this recently published narrative review published in the British Journal of Nursing, Ibeh et al (2024) explore the...

Research Roundup

Digital health and self-management among patients with chronic disease have been gaining in popularity over recent years. The number of people living with diabetes in particular is steadily on the...

Research Roundup

The significant role of mental health in overall health and wellbeing is being increasingly recognised, along with the contribution of holistic non-pharmacological approaches to their management. In...

Community nurses can empower people living with lymphoedema

While there has been a half-hearted shift in recent years towards more patient education, self-care and patient empowerment, we still operate within a system that teaches patients to give themselves...

Malnutrition and nutrition in the community

The importance of good nutrition for our overall health and in the prevention (and even the reversal) of disease tends to be somewhat overlooked in modern-day society.

Off-label use of quetiapine

Quetiapine is a second-generation antipsychotic, primarily intended for use in people with schizophrenia, type-one or -two bipolar disorder, or as an adjunct for major depressive disorder (NHS...

Supporting patients to prevent urinary tract infection and self-catheterise

A study carried out by Okamoto et al (2017) found that there is uncertainty among intermittent self-catherisation (ISC) users regarding the signs and symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI) and at...

Impact of Lifestyle on Cognitive Decline, Part 2: Looking Beyond Diet

Jia et al (2023) assessed the below six healthy lifestyle factors: Healthy diet (adherence to the recommended intake of at least seven of eligible food items)Regular physical exercise (≥150 minutes...

Impact of lifestyle on cognitive decline, part one: the role of diet

he discussion regarding what really affects our brains throughout our lives has been ongoing for some time. We know that alcohol and drugs are part of a lifestyle that can damage our brains, and we...

Machine learning for treatment optimisation: part two

Taliaz et al (2021) explored the use of machine learning to optimise treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD), which is multifactorial, and poses a challenge to the tailoring of optimal...

Machine learning for precision treatment: part one

In a study published in Heart, Sotomi et al (2023) examined the use of machine learning to identify cohorts of a population that may benefit from specific medications. The team had previously...

New research to support the achievability of diabetes remission in general practice

A fairly novel concept, which now has considerable backing by clinical research, relates to the ability for diabetes to reverse—that is, to go into remission. According to Diabetes UK (2023),...

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: potential new treatments

Pradhan et al (2022) examined whether the use of the receptor agonist glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2)...

Use of decongestants in cold and flu season

As we make our way through cold and flu season, nurses in the community are likely to encounter many patients with varying degrees of illness from these viruses..

Medication savings for the NHS and for patients

Over the years, cheaper versions of the same drugs have been acquired by NHS England. An example of this is the drug adalimumab (NHS England, 2022), which is used to treat over 45 000 patients with...

Why choose British Journal of Community Nursing?

British Journal of Community Nursing provides clinical education dedicated to nursing in the home. Our goal is to help you develop your skills, improve your practice and manage cases more effectively.

What's included

  • Evidence-based best practice

  • Peer-reviewed research

  • Focus on elderly care and long-term conditions

  • CPD support

Subscriptions start:

From £13.25 GBP